Search

Site news

The problem with user accounts expiring has been fixed.  If you are having any problems logging in please contact us.
Historic graphs are now available.
Health Sentinel news now appears on google news - check news.google.com
The problem with e-mail an article has now been fixed.

Over 100 original articles on health and other topics such as the environment and the economy are now available.

Fight World Hunger
Home
Looking At The Estimated 218,000 Deaths Each Year From Adverse Drug Events PDF Print E-mail
Written by Roman Bystrianyk   
Wednesday, 03 November 2004 00:00

According to the CDC, in July of 2000, the three leading causes of death were heart disease at 724,859 per year, cancer at 541,532 per year, and stroke at 158,448 per year. A recent study in Drug Safety looks at how to quantify the much lesser known number of deaths caused by adverse drug events or ADEs for short.

Adverse drug events (ADEs) present the single greatest risk of harm to patients in hospitals. An adverse drug event is an unwanted or harmful side effect experienced following the administration of a pharmaceutical or combination of pharmaceuticals. In the United States ADEs account for an estimated 218,000 deaths each year and cost from $30 to $130 billion each year.

“The direct medical costs associated with ADEs have been estimated to be in the range of $US30 billion to $US130 billion annually in the US alone. These estimates are even more meaningful when compared with other high cost conditions or diseases, such as diabetes mellitus ($US45.2 billion), obesity ($US70 billion), and cardiovascular disease ($US199.5 billion). Drug-related mortality has been estimated to claim 218,000 lives annually.”


Read 0 Comments... >>
Last Updated on Friday, 11 September 2009 16:26
Read more...
 
Red and Processed Meats Increases Risk of Colorectal Cancer PDF Print E-mail
Written by Roman Bystrianyk   
Friday, 29 October 2004 00:00

In 1997, the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute of Cancer Research announced that red meat and processed meat could increase the risk of colorectal cancer. A new study in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention concludes that fresh red meat and processed meat do just that. However, they also found that consumption of fish and chicken did not increase the risk.

The study, conducted in Melbourne Australia, examined the diets of over 37,000 people from 1990 to 1994. After controlling for a number of possible confounding variables they found that the group that ate the most red meat and processed meat were twice as likely to get rectal cancer.


Read 0 Comments... >>
Last Updated on Friday, 11 September 2009 16:26
Read more...
 
Breastfeeding Reduces Need For Antimicrobials PDF Print E-mail
Written by Roman Bystrianyk   
Friday, 22 October 2004 00:00

Breastfeeding has been shown to reduce the number of infections in infants. Studies have shown a decreased incidence of meningitis, sepsis, pneumococcal disease, as well as resistant pneumococcal bacterium as compared with their formula-fed peers. Breastfeeding also reduces diarrheal disease, urinary tract infections, ear infections, as well as respiratory illnesses. Many of these illnesses result in the use of antimicrobials, with up to 53% of all antimicrobials being prescribed to 0-4 year olds.

A recent study in Clinical Pediatrics further demonstrates the importance of breastfeeding in reducing infections. The study shows by reducing infections that breastfed babies greatly reduce the need for antimicrobials. In fact, the number of days infants spent on antimicrobials was half that of those being fed formula. “The mean number of days receiving antimicrobials was also significantly higher in formula-fed infants at both the 6- and 12-month levels in comparison to breastfed infants. Breastfeeding babies spent 48% as much time receiving antimicrobials by 6 months of age as their formula-fed peers did.” The study also showed that continued breastfeeding beyond 6 months also had a positive effect in less antimicrobial use.


Read 0 Comments... >>
Last Updated on Wednesday, 09 September 2009 02:12
Read more...
 
Green tea helps protects the liver PDF Print E-mail
Written by Roman Bystrianyk   
Wednesday, 29 September 2004 00:00

A new study finds that green tea helps protect the liver from damage. Green tea contains compounds called polyphenols. These polyphenols have received the most attention because of their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The main constituent, that also has the highest antioxidant properties, is epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG for short.

The study authors exposed groups of mice to a toxic substance – carbon tetrachloride. The group that was given EGCG for 3 days prior to administration of this toxic substance had markedly less liver damage than the group that did not receive the EGCG. In fact, the EGCG group’s liver measurements were close to that of the control group that didn’t receive the carbon tetrachloride at all.


Read 0 Comments... >>
Last Updated on Friday, 11 September 2009 16:27
Read more...
 
Yogurt with probiotics fights Helicobacter pylori PDF Print E-mail
Written by Roman Bystrianyk   
Tuesday, 21 September 2004 00:00

Most of us have heard the old saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”. Well it turns out that a yogurt a day can also keep the doctor away or more accurately the probiotics in the yogurt actually do the trick. In the September issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the authors of a study researched the effect of ingesting yogurt containing probiotic cultures on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).

Helicobacter pylori is a type of bacteria that can cause stomach ulcers. Infection with this organism also plays a role in stomach cancer. Although there are effective antibiotic-based therapies for treating this bacteria the authors state, “we were concerned about their possible induction of resistance to antibacterial drugs. Furthermore, the side effects of these kinds of therapies are a common cause of treatment discontinuation.”

Probiotics are live microbial feed supplements, which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance. “Lactobacillus and bifidobacteria are added to several fermented diary products and are known to have an inhibitory growth effect on a wide range of intestinal pathogens in humans and animals.”

Their study showed that consumption of probiotic yogurt significantly decreased the amount of H. pylori. They note that H. pylori adhere to the walls of the stomach and that part of the explanation of the benefit of probiotics can be explained by a “barrier effect” created by the probiotic bacterium.


Read 0 Comments... >>
Last Updated on Friday, 11 September 2009 16:28
Read more...
 
Washing hands saves lives PDF Print E-mail
Written by Roman Bystrianyk   
Monday, 20 September 2004 00:00

According to the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, approximately 2 million patients in the United States acquire infections while hospitalized for other conditions. These infections account for 88,000 deaths and cost approximately $4.6 billion. In the September addition of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, a study examines how a simple technique of hand washing can reduce these infections.

According to the study, “Nosocomial [originating in the hospital] infections constitute a major source of morbidity and mortality for patients in neonatal [first 4 weeks after birth] intensive care units (NICUs). Prior surveillance studies have shown that the rates of nosocomial infections range from 11% to 22%.” Despite the use of prophylactic antibiotics, and a variety of barriers infections in NICUs still remain high.


Read 0 Comments... >>
Last Updated on Friday, 11 September 2009 16:28
Read more...
 
Coeliac disease more common than thought PDF Print E-mail
Written by Roman Bystrianyk   
Sunday, 19 September 2004 00:00

Coeliac disease is a lifelong intolerance to gluten. One of the primary sources of gluten is found in wheat-based products such as bread and pasta. A recent study published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood examines the prevalence of this disease.

Untreated coeliac disease can result in malabsorption, vitamin deficiencies, anemia [abnormally low number of red blood cells], and osteoporosis. It’s important to resolve this condition as, “dietary avoidance of gluten results in a complete remission of the disease and prevents two major complications – malignancy and osteoporosis – as well as decreasing mortality in CD [cardiovascular disease] patients.”


Read 0 Comments... >>
Last Updated on Friday, 11 September 2009 16:29
Read more...
 
Magnesium overlooked in cardiovascular and other conditions PDF Print E-mail
Written by Roman Bystrianyk   
Tuesday, 14 September 2004 00:00

Magnesium is an often overlooked mineral that is essential to life and important in the prevention and treatment of a variety of conditions, including high blood pressure, irregular hearth beat, heart attack, and others. In the August issue of American Journal of Health-System Pharmacists, author John G. Gums discusses the importance of magnesium in human health.

Magnesium plays an important role in more than 300 enzyme reactions in the human body. It is involved in energy metabolism, glucose utilization, protein synthesis, muscle contraction, and virtually all hormonal reactions. Magnesium is involved in maintaining cellular balance and is associated with calcium, potassium, and sodium. Approximately half the body’s magnesium is located in the bones and the other half in the muscles and other soft tissues. Less than 1% of magnesium is located in the blood.

Dietary intake of magnesium has declined over time. “The dietary intake of magnesium declined in the United States from 475-500 mg/day in 1900 to 215-283 mg/day in 1990, possibly owing to an increase in the consumption of processed foods. Good sources of magnesium include green leafy vegetables, grains, dried fruit, shellfish and nuts.”


Read 0 Comments... >>
Last Updated on Friday, 11 September 2009 16:29
Read more...
 
« StartPrev11121314151617181920NextEnd »

Page 20 of 21

Graphs

graphs

News Flashback

Adding to evidence that smoking is bad for a man's sex life, new study findings show that smoking may raise the risk of impotence, particularly in younger men. Researchers found that among the more than 1,300 men they followed, those who smoked...

Read more...

Did you know?

“Water is essential for life. It is the key resource for people's good health, for irrigating crops, for providing hydropower, for protecting ecosystems. Despite the broad recognition of the central role of water in sustainable development, including in efforts to eradicate...

Read more...

Who's Online

We have 115 guests online