Home World News Neurotoxicity Results from Chronic Drinking, Which Increases Levels of Stress Hormones
Neurotoxicity Results from Chronic Drinking, Which Increases Levels of Stress Hormones PDF Print E-mail
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Friday, 10 September 2010 00:00
It is generally known that alcohol consumption, withdrawal, and abstinence can all raise stress hormones in humans and animals.

A review has described how stress hormones called glucocorticoids are associated with neurotoxicity during abstinence after withdrawal from alcohol dependence.Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism may therefore represent a pharmacological option for recovery.

Both drinking and withdrawal from chronic drinking can raise circulating glucocorticoid levels, known as cortisol in humans and corticosterone in rodents. Prolonged and high concentrations of glucocorticoids can have damaging effects on neuronal function and cognition. Evidence shows that glucocorticoids are associated with neurotoxicity during abstinence after withdrawal from alcohol dependence (AD), and that glucocorticoid receptor antagonism may represent a pharmacological option for recovery.

A review of this evidence will be published in the December 2010 issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research and are currently available at Early View.

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