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Water and Sanitation
waterAbout 1.2 billion people still have no access to safe drinking water, and 2.4 billion do not have adequate sanitation services. Some 2 million children die every year from water-related diseases. In the poorest countries, one in five children dies before the age of five mainly from water-related infectious diseases arising from insufficient water availability, in both quantity and quality. Thus provision of safe drinking water and sanitation services to more than 1 billion people over the next decade remains one of the most critical challenges humanity is facing today.

Comment:

This is a mammoth human tragedy and an outrage. The equivalent of two world trade center/9-11 terrorist assaults occurs daily to children in the world from a lack of clean drinking water and sanitation. This is a crime that is hardly mentioned by western governments, the press, or very many people at all. While the creation of systems to supply fresh water and eliminate waste, and the hygiene revolution essentially eliminated all diseases that plagued western societies in the 1800s and early 1900s, this increased stress on clean water and sanitation systems, western societies could also find themselves reliving a part of history most would not welcome. We need to pay attention to this major health problem that plagues the world or suffer the consequences of our inaction.


A Framework for Action on Water and Sanitation PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 01 August 2002 00:00
“Water is essential for life. It is the key resource for people's good health, for irrigating crops, for providing hydropower, for protecting ecosystems. Despite the broad recognition of the central role of water in sustainable development, including in efforts to eradicate poverty, addressing the water needs of the poor through concerted global action has not been given enough priority. While progress has been made over the decade since the Rio Earth Summit, on average it has been slower than anticipated.”

“Water resources in many countries remain fragile, more due to poor demand-and-supply management than to actual water scarcity. Measures promoting sustainable use of water are far from satisfactory. About 1.2 billion people still have no access to safe drinking water, and 2.4 billion do not have adequate sanitation services. Some 2 million children die every year from water-related diseases. In the poorest countries, one in five children dies before the age of five mainly from water-related infectious diseases arising from insufficient water availability, in both quantity and quality. Thus provision of safe drinking water and sanitation services to more than 1 billion people over the next decade remains one of the most critical challenges humanity is facing today.”
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