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Fight World Hunger
Home Journal Excerpts Cancer and Micronutrients
Cancer and Micronutrients
fruitApproximately 40 micronutrients (the vitamins, essential minerals and other compounds required in small amounts for normal metabolism) are required in the human diet. For many micronutrients, a sizable percentage of the population is deficient relative to the current RDA. Remedying these deficiencies, which can be done at low cost, is likely to lead to a major improvement in health and an increase in longevity..

Comment:

This well researched scientific paper, with 169 scientific references, shows us that a major cause of cancer, and disease in general, is from nutritional deficiencies. We need a national and global health campaign that will provide to everyone with access to good quality multivitamin-mineral pills; fresh fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains; clean water; and emphasize the elimination of nutritionally deficient junk foods. When we do this we will see a drastic decrease in cancer and other illnesses and overall improvement in health and well being.


DNA damage from micronutrient deficiencies is likely to be a major cause of cancer PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 01 January 2001 00:00
“Approximately 40 micronutrients (the vitamins, essential minerals and other compounds required in small amounts for normal metabolism) are required in the human diet. For each micronutrient, metabolic harmony requires an optimal intake (i.e. to give maximum life span); deficiency distorts metabolism in numerous and complicated ways many of which may lead to DNA damage. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of a micronutrient is mainly based on information on acute effects, because the optimum amount for long term health is generally not known. For many micronutrients, a sizable percentage of the population is deficient relative to the current RDA. Remedying these deficiencies, which can be done at low cost, is likely to lead to a major improvement in health and an increase in longevity. The optimum intake of a micronutrient can vary with age and genetic constitution, state of well being, and be influenced by other aspects of diet. Determining these optima, and remedying deficiencies, and in some cases excesses, will be a major public health project for the coming decades. Long term health is also influenced by many other aspects of diet. Though this paper uses most examples from the US, the situation seems similar in many other countries.”

“Micronutrient deficiency can mimic radiation (or chemicals) in damaging DNA by causing single- and double-strand breaks, or oxidative lesions, or both. Chromosomal aberrations such as double strand breaks are a strong predictive factor for human cancer. Those micronutrients whose deficiency mimics radiation are folic acid, B12, B6, niacin, C, E, iron, and zinc, with the laboratory evidence ranging from likely to compelling. The percentage of the US population, for example, that is deficient (< 50% of the RDA) for each of these eight micronutrients ranges from 2 to > 20%, and may compromise in toto a considerable percentage of the US population. We have used < 50% of the US RDA as a measure of low intake because these numbers are available. However, the level of each micronutrient that minimizes DNA damage remains to be determined.”

“Micronutrient deficiency is a plausible explanation for the strong epidemiological evidence that shows an association between low consumption of fruits and vegetables and cancer at most sites.”
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