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Fight World Hunger
Vitamins
vitaminsInsufficient vitamin intake is apparently the cause of chronic diseases. Recent evidence has shown that suboptimal levels of vitamins, even well above those causing deficiency syndromes, are risk factors for chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and osteoporosis. A large portion of the general population is apparently at increase risk for this reason.

Comment:

Finally, the flag ship journal of the American Medical Association has recommended what scores have know for many years; that taking a multiple vitamin will make an impact on disease. We can only hope that this trend continues and physicians take heed and recommend vitamins to their patients. The result can only be a major increase in health and well being for people everywhere.


Vitamins for Chronic Disease Prevention in Adults - Clinical Applications PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 19 June 2002 00:00
"In the absence of specific predisposing conditions, a usual North American diet is sufficient to prevent overt vitamin deficiency diseases such as scurvy, pellagra, and beriberi. However, insufficient vitamin intake is apparently the cause of chronic diseases. Recent evidence has shown that suboptimal levels of vitamins, even well above those causing deficiency syndromes, are risk factors for chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and osteoporosis. A large portion of the general population is apparently at increase risk for this reason."

"Suboptimal Amounts of Vitamins - Suboptimal levels of a vitamin can be defined as those associated with abnormalities of metabolism that can be corrected by supplementation with that vitamin. For example, many people in the general population have serum homocysteine levels from 1.62 to 2.03 mg/L (12-15 µmol/L), which fall to baseline levels of 1.08 to 1.35 mg/L (8-10 µmol/L) after a few weeks of supplementation with folate, along with vitamins B12 and B6. Similarly, in many elderly people, methylmalonic acid levels fall with vitamin B12 supplementation, and elevated levels of parathyroid hormone fall with vitamin D supplementation. Measurements of vitamin levels in blood, serum, or red blood cells, at least with current reference points for abnormality, are not a reliable guide to this form of deficiency; in one study, supplementation substantially reduced serum homocysteine levels in elderly patients with normal serum folate concentrations."

"For some vitamins, the concept of suboptimal levels is also supported by randomized trial evidence that supplementation reduces the rate of clinical events. The research evidence is conclusive that folate during the first trimester of pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects in women at increased risk. Similarly, with vitamin D supplementation, along with calcium, reduces the risk of fractures in elderly women with osteoporosis."
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