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Vegetarians Live Longer
vegtablesOverall vegetarians had a mortality about half that of the general population. Within the cohort, daily consumption of fresh fruit was associated with significantly reduced mortality from ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and for all causes combined.

Comment:

The study speaks volumes on how a vegetarian diet reduces overall mortality by an enormous 50%. We greatly need to encourage everyone in society to avoid nutritionally poor junk foods and concentrate on healthy vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beneficial fats.


Dietary habits and mortality in 11,000 vegetarians and health conscious people: results of a 17 year follow up PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 28 September 1996 00:00
"Objective - To investigate the association of dietary habits with mortality in a cohort of vegetarians and other health conscious people."

"Subjects - 4336 men and 6435 women recruited through health food shops, vegetarian societies, and magazines."

"Main outcome measures - Mortality ratios for vegetarianism and for daily versus less than daily consumption of wholemeal bread, bran cereals, nuts or dried fruit, fresh fruit, and raw salad in relation to all cause mortality and mortality from ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, all malignant neoplasms, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and breast cancer."

"Results - Overall the cohort had a mortality about half that of the general population. Within the cohort, daily consumption of fresh fruit was associated with significantly reduced mortality from ischaemic heart disease (rate ratio adjusted for smoking 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.97)), cerebrovascular disease (0.68 (.047 to 0.98)), and for all causes combined (0.79 (0.70 to 0.90))."

"After a mean of 16.8 years of follow up (maximum 21.3 years) mortality was substantially lower than in the general population; the standarised mortality ratio for all causes of death was 0.56 (95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.59) for men and women combined. Table 2 shows the standardized mortality ratios were significantly below one for all malignant neoplasms, cancer of the stomach, cancer of the large intestine and rectum (subsequently referred to as colorectal cancer), cancer of the bronchus and lung, diabetes mellitus, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases of the respiratory system, diseases of the digestive system, and diseases of the genitourinary system. Among women, standardized mortality ratios were significantly below one for all malignant neoplasms, cancer of the bronchus and lung, diabetes mellitus, mental disorders, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases of the respiratory system, and diseases of the digestive system."
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