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Kids, Sugar, and Ritalin
childrenThe results of this study identified significant differences in the behaviors of young children after they had received a sucrose challenge as compared to a placebo. It is estimated that, on the average, each child in the United States consumes close to 2 pounds of dietary sugar each week, and that approximately 70% of this sugar is in the form of sucrose. Relationships between sugar consumption and a variety of health problems such as dental caries and obesity have been well documented.

Comment:

We are a society that is addicted to sugar. We especially feed our kids a wide variety of sugary junk foods like breakfast cereals, sodas, candy, cakes, and many others all in the name of fun. It's almost as if fun cannot exist without eating unhealthy junk food. As a consequence kids suffer from an epidemic of obesity as well as a wide variety of other problems. Also one of the results are kids that are over stimulated in part due to sugar and caffeine have more trouble paying attention in classrooms. Instead of attempting to address the attention problem though proper diet, discipline, understanding, and love we have predominately turned to medicating them at an ever-increasing rate.


Behavioural disorders are overdiagnosed in US PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 16 March 1996 00:00
"American children are probably being over diagnosed as having a behavioral disorder and being overprescribed drugs to treat it, says a report by the United Nations' International Narcotics Board. The agency, based in Vienna, was asked by the US Drug Enforcement Administration to look into the diagnosis and treatment of attention deficit disorder. The agencies are concerned with the rapid growth in prescriptions for methylphenidate, and amphetamine marketed in the US as Ritalin. In 1990 worldwide production was less than 3 tonnes, but by 1994 more than 8.5 tonnes were being prescribed. About 90% of these prescriptions were to American children, adolescents, and adults."
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Effects of Methylphenidate in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systemic, Placebo-Controlled Evaluation PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 01 August 1990 00:00
"Stimulant medication, particularly methylphenidate (Ritalin), has become an increasingly common treatement for the management of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent surverys estimate that between 3% and 6% of elementary-school-aged children are taking medication for management of attention deficits and hyperactivity, with stimulants representing 99% of the medications prescribed. This represents an increase of up to 248% in the rate of prescribing such medication during the past 10 years."


Barkley, Russell A. PhD, McMurray, Mary B. MD, Edelbrock, Craig S. PhD, and Robbins Kathy, "Effects of Methylphenidate in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systemic, Placebo-Controlled Evaluation", Pediatrics, August 1, 1990, Vol. 86, Num. 2, pp. 184-192


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Last Updated on Friday, 26 June 2009 01:11
 
Behavioral Effects of Sucrose on Preschool Children PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 01 January 1986 00:00
"It is estimated that, on the average, each child in the United States consumes close to 2 pounds of dietary sugar each week, and that approximately 70% of this sugar is in the form of sucrose (i.e. table sugar) (Morgan & Zabik, 1981, Riddle & Prinz, 1984). Relationships between sugar consumption and a variety of health problems such as dental caries and obesity have been well documented."

"The results of this study identified significant differences in the behaviors of young children after they had received a sucrose challenge as compared to a placebo. After the sucrose challenge children showed a decrement in performance in a structured testing situation and they were more restless and less task-oriented during periods of free play. … Within the free-play situation both locomotion and distractibility increased sharply during the play session that took place 40 to 55 minutes following the sucrose challenge. Similarly, the number of errors made on the CPT [Continuous Performance Task] increased during the testing session that took place 1 hour after the challenge. These results are consistent with the findings that in children the most marked metabolic responses to sugar challenge (such as changes in concentration in serum glucose) occur within the 1st hour (Pickens, Burkeholder, & Womack, 1967)."
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